Salim Adolfo speaks to community volunteers at the Petey Greene Community Center.

Around here, we strive to make a difference in the communities we live in through social equality. We understand we are the grassroots in these concrete jungles and we do what we can without waiting for a government handout or a mystery god to bring us relief. We come together and do the work. No excuses.

Being righteous means being ready, willing, and able to organize with others, volunteer, pitch in, and do the work our community deserves. When it comes to life’s most basic necessities, we organize ourselves to donate food, clothing, and toiletries to those less fortunate. If we see something that’s needed in the hood, we should come together to provide it or build it. Sometimes, this means volunteering.

The altruistic activity of volunteering promotes good, improves the quality of life of others, and allows for socialization, networking, and fun. It’s much more than getting a check. It’s about community ties and caring enough about each other to give to those who are unable to do for themselves. Around here, we put that into practice.

On Saturday, March 10th, community members, and organizations volunteered in a Feed the Hood Project held every month at the Petey Greene Community Service Center in Washington, D.C. The community center is in Ward 8, one of the poorest neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River. Those who volunteered truly lived out the meaning of poor righteous teachers.

The DMV Social, An Earthly Embrace, the Five Percent Nation of Gods & Earths, Movers & Shakers in the Community, Movement for Black Power, the National Black United Front, and Swing Phi Swing, are just some of the many organizations who co-sponsored the event.

The Feed the Hood Project provided care packages which helped families in need with personal hygiene items, first aid kits, clothing, and nonperishable foods. In an each-one-teach-one effort, participants passed out educational flyers about the effects of marijuana and knowledge aimed at inspiring youth to maintain top grades in school.

The support of the community drove the act of good will up Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard where Salim Adolfo and others engaged passersby. Without any government or corporate grants, brothers and sisters organized themselves and did something to improve the quality of life in the community.

Around here, this is how we do it each and every day, in each and every way. We’re going to show and prove and teach the righteous way. If you want to learn more about volunteering or the righteous way, pick up a copy of The Righteous Way (Pt. 1) and/or The Golden Jubilee Edition (Pt. 2) over at The Righteous Way website.